Voting FAQ's

To be able to vote you must be registered.

Voting in person

Most people in the UK choose to cast their vote in person at a local polling station Voting at a polling station is very straightforward and there is always a member of staff available to help if you're not sure what to do.

If you are on the electoral register, you will receive a poll card before the election telling you where and when to vote. The polling station is often a school or local hall near where you live. The poll card is for your information only, and you do not need to take it to the polling station in order to vote.

The following five steps explain how to vote at your polling station on election day:

On election day, go to your local polling station. Polling station opening hours are 7am - 10pm. If you are disabled and need assistance getting to the polling station, contact your electoral registration office to find out what help is available. You can also ask to have a companion with you when you vote, or staff in the polling station may be able to help you..

  1. Tell the staff inside the polling station your name and address so they can check that you are on the electoral register. You can show them your poll card, but you do not need it to vote.
  2. The staff at the polling station will give you a ballot paper listing the parties and candidates you can vote for. It will be stamped with an official mark. You may be given more than one ballot paper if there is more than one election on the same day. If you have a visual impairment, you can ask for a special voting device that allows you to vote on your own in secret.
  3. Take your ballot paper into a polling booth so that no one can see how you vote. Read the ballot paper carefully, it will tell you how to cast your vote. Do not write anything else on the paper or your vote may not be counted.
  4. Finally, when you have marked your vote, fold the ballot paper in half and put it in the ballot box. Do not let anyone see your vote. If you are not clear on what to do, ask the staff at the polling station to help you.

 

Voting by post

Voting by post is an easy and convenient way of voting if you are unable to get to the polling station. This section tells you how voting by post works.

To vote by post, you need to be on the electoral register. Then you need to fill in a postal vote application form.  Applications to apply to vote by post must be returned at least eleven working days before the election date.

You need to sign your application form personally because the electoral registration office needs a copy of your signature for voting security reasons. We know it's slightly less convenient than submitting it online, but it helps to ensure the security of your vote and is used to tackle electoral fraud.

Who can apply for a postal vote?

Anyone aged 18 or over who is on the electoral register can apply for a postal vote. You do not need a reason to vote by post.

Where can I get my postal vote sent?

A postal vote can be sent to your home address or to any other address that you give. Postal votes can be sent overseas, but you need to consider whether there will be enough time to receive and return your ballot paper by election day.

When will I receive my ballot papers?

Postal votes are usually sent out about a week before election day. Once you've got it, mark your vote on the ballot paper and make sure you send it back so that it arrives by close of poll (which is 10pm on election day). If it arrives later than this your vote won't be counted.

When you get your postal voting papers:

Don't let anyone else handle them
Make sure they are not left where someone else can pick them up
Complete your ballot paper in secret, on your own
Don't let anyone else vote for you
Don't let anyone else see your vote
Don't give the ballot paper to anyone else
Put the ballot paper in the envelope and seal it up yourself
Complete and sign the postal voting statement
Take it to the post box yourself, if you can
If you can't give it to somebody you know and trust to post it for you,
Don't hand it to a candidate or party worker
Don't leave it where someone else can pick it up

Remember that this is your vote - so keep it to yourself

If anyone tries to help you against your will, or force you to give them your postal vote, you should contact the police. If you have any other queries, ring your local electoral registration office

Voting by proxy

Voting by proxy is a convenient way of voting if you are unable to get to the polling station. By proxy just means that you appoint someone you trust to vote on your behalf.

Voting by proxy can be useful if you fall ill and are unable to get to the polling station on election day, or if you are abroad during an election. It can be particularly useful if you are overseas in a country too far away to send back a postal vote in time for the election.

To vote by proxy, you'll need to fill in an application form. You.

You need to sign your application form personally because the electoral registration office needs a copy of your signature for voting security reasons. We know it's slightly less convenient than submitting it online, but it helps to ensure the security of your vote and is used to tackle electoral fraud.

Can I apply for a proxy vote?

You can apply for a proxy vote as long as you are on the electoral register. When you apply for a proxy vote you have to provide a reason. You can apply for a proxy vote if:

  • You are unable to go to the polling station for one particular election, for example, if you are away on holiday
  • You have a physical condition that means you cannot go to the polling station on election day
  • Your employment means that you cannot go to the polling station on election day
  • Your attendance on an educational course means that you cannot go to the polling station on election day
  • You are a British citizen living overseas
  • You are a crown servant or a member of Her Majesty's Armed Forces

Except if you are registered blind, you may have to get someone to support your application to confirm that your reason for applying to vote by proxy is valid. Read the notes that accompany the application form to find out if you need to get someone to support your application and who can do it.

When can I apply to vote by proxy?

The deadline for applying to vote by proxy is normally 6 working days before an election. However, if you have a medical emergency 6 days before election day or after, you can apply to vote by emergency proxy if the emergency means that you cannot go to the polling station in person.

Who can vote on my behalf?

Anyone can be your proxy as long as they are eligible to vote in that type of election and they are willing to vote on your behalf.

You cannot be a proxy for more than two people at any one election, unless they are a close relative.

 

When do elections take place ?

For information on any current elections go to the current elections page.

How can I get Electoral forms in - large print / Audio / or different languages ?

Either contact the registration officer on 01386 565437,
email elections@wychavon.gov.uk,
or visit the Electoral Commission website for further details.

How can I contact my local representative?

To find details of your local parish council, district and county councillors and Member of Parliament (MP) visit My Local Area.

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