Follow the links to find the information you need:

Registering to vote

To be able to vote you must be registered. This is a quick and easy process that can be done online. If you have recently turned 18 or moved house you may need to register to vote.

Read our registering to vote FAQs for more information.

Current elections

For information on any Current elections in Wychavon go to the current elections page or Types and Timing of Elections.

How voting will change during Covid-19

Covid-19 and social distancing restrictions will still be part of our lives when elections take place in on 6 May. That is why we are having to make some changes to the way you vote to help keep you, and our elections staff, safe.

We do not have answers to every question you may have at the moment as the situation keeps changing but we will update this page regularly as we get more information. 

Below are some simple FAQs which answer the most common questions we receive. You can find more information in the Government's May 2021 polls delivery plan.

How can I vote in the May 2021 elections?

You are encouraged to consider voting by post or proxy - where you send someone else to vote on your behalf - at this election but we are putting measures in place to make sure you can vote in person on the day.

If you're thinking about voting by post, you can apply to do this now. This will make sure your application is processed early, and your postal vote can be sent to you more quickly once the candidates for the elections are confirmed.

You will need to apply to vote by post and apply to vote by proxy by downloading and filling out the forms on this page and sending them back to us.

The deadline to apply for a postal vote and cancel or make changes to a current postal or proxy vote at this election is 5pm on 20 April 2021. The deadline to apply for a proxy vote at this election is 5pm on 27 April 2021.

Is voting by post safe?

Yes, voting by post is safe and proven cases of electoral fraud are rare. When voting by post, you should mark your vote on the ballot paper in secret and seal the envelope yourself.

You will also be asked to give your date of birth and signature when applying for a postal or proxy vote. This makes postal voting safe, because when you return your postal voting pack your signature and date of birth are checked against those you provided before to confirm your identity.

Your signature and date of birth are separated from your ballot paper before it is looked at or counted, so giving this information will not affect the secrecy of your vote.

How are you making polling stations safe?

We are putting arrangements in place to help ensure polling stations are safe places to vote. You can expect many of the measures you’ve become used to over recent months in shops and banks, such as hand sanitiser and floor markings to support social distancing.

Staff and voters will be required to wear a face covering unless legally exempt.

Watch this explainer video on voting in person during Covid-19 so you know what to expect.

Can I vote at my usual polling station?

Some of our current polling stations may change location as they are based in high risk settings such as care homes; this is to protect both vulnerable residents and voters.

We will try to keep polling stations in their usual place but some changes may be necessary. Please check your poll card for details of your polling station.

Poll cards will be delivered about a month before the election. If you are unsure where your polling station is please check Wychavon's polling station finder or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  or call 01386 565437.

Will I need to bring my own pen or pencil?

It is recommended you bring your own pen or pencil to avoid the risk of surface transmission of the virus.

Is it safer to vote by post, instead of going in person?

We are working hard to ensure that polling stations will be safe places to vote in May, but you can choose to apply to vote by post or by proxy instead.

What should I do if I find out closer to the time that I need to self-isolate?

Contact us as soon as possible. The Government has made arrangements so those self-isolating as a result of coronavirus exposure, testing for or having symptoms of Covid-19, can apply for a proxy vote in the days leading up to polling day and until 5pm on the day itself, without having to find someone to witness their application.

This will also be available to those who test positive for the virus, on the same basis. If a person already has a proxy appointed to vote for them, but the proxy is then affected by Covid-19, there will also be the ability to make an alternative proxy arrangement. It remains vital that those who need to self-isolate continue to do so.

You should not enter a polling station to cast your vote if you have symptoms of Covid-19, are being tested for the virus or should be self-isolating following a positive test result or advice to do so by the NHS Test and Trace service.

Voting in person

Most people in the UK choose to cast their vote in person at a polling station. Voting at a polling station is very straightforward and there is always a member of staff available to help if you're not sure what to do.

If you are on the electoral register, you will receive a poll card before the election telling you where and when to vote. The polling station is often a school or local hall near where you live. The poll card is for your information only, and you do not need to take it to the polling station in order to vote.

The following five steps explain pdf how to vote (153 KB) at your polling station on election day:

On election day, go to your local polling station. Polling station opening hours are 7am - 10pm. If you are disabled and need assistance getting to the polling station, contact your electoral registration office to find out what help is available. You can also ask to have a companion with you when you vote, or staff in the polling station may be able to help you..

  1. Tell the staff inside the polling station your name and address so they can check that you are on the electoral register. You can show them your poll card, but you do not need it to vote.
  2. The staff at the polling station will give you a ballot paper listing the parties and candidates you can vote for. It will be stamped with an official mark. You may be given more than one ballot paper if there is more than one election on the same day. If you have a visual impairment, you can ask for a special voting device that allows you to vote on your own in secret.
  3. Take your ballot paper into a polling booth so that no one can see how you vote. Read the ballot paper carefully, it will tell you how to cast your vote. Do not write anything else on the paper or your vote may not be counted.
  4. Finally, when you have marked your vote, fold the ballot paper in half and put it in the ballot box. Do not let anyone see your vote. If you are not clear on what to do, ask the staff at the polling station to help you.

Voting by post

The deadline to apply for a postal vote and cancel or make changes to a current postal or proxy vote at the next election in May is 5pm on 20 April 2021

Voting by post is an easy and convenient way of voting if you are unable to get to the polling station. This section tells you how voting by post works.

To vote by post, you need to be on the electoral register. Then you need to fill in a postal vote application form.  Applications to apply to vote by post must be returned at least eleven working days before the election date.

You need to sign your application form personally because the electoral registration office needs a copy of your signature for voting security reasons. We know it's slightly less convenient than submitting it online, but it helps to ensure the security of your vote and is used to tackle electoral fraud.

Who can apply for a postal vote?

Anyone aged 18 or over who is on the electoral register can apply for a postal vote. You do not need a reason to vote by post.

Where can I get my postal vote sent?

A postal vote can be sent to your home address or to any other address that you give. Postal votes can be sent overseas, but you need to consider whether there will be enough time to receive and return your ballot paper by election day.

When will I receive my ballot papers?

Postal votes are usually sent out about a week before election day. Once you've got it, mark your vote on the ballot paper and make sure you send it back so that it arrives by close of poll (which is 10pm on election day). If it arrives later than this your vote won't be counted.

When you get your postal voting papers:

  • Don't let anyone else handle them
  • Make sure they are not left where someone else can pick them up
  • Complete your ballot paper in secret, on your own
  • Don't let anyone else vote for you
  • Don't let anyone else see your vote
  • Don't give the ballot paper to anyone else
  • Put the ballot paper in the envelope and seal it up yourself
  • Complete and sign the postal voting statement
  • Take it to the post box yourself, if you can
  • If you can't give it to somebody you know and trust to post it for you,
  • Don't hand it to a candidate or party worker
  • Don't leave it where someone else can pick it up
Remember that this is your vote - so keep it to yourself

If anyone tries to help you against your will, or force you to give them your postal vote, you should contact the police. If you have any other queries, ring your local electoral registration office

Voting by proxy

The deadline to apply for a proxy vote at the next election is 5pm on 27 April 2021.

Voting by proxy is a convenient way of voting if you are unable to get to the polling station. By proxy just means that you appoint someone you trust to vote on your behalf.

Voting by proxy can be useful if you fall ill and are unable to get to the polling station on election day, or if you are abroad during an election. It can be particularly useful if you are overseas in a country too far away to send back a postal vote in time for the election.

To vote by proxy, you'll need to fill in an application form.

You need to sign your application form personally because the electoral registration office needs a copy of your signature for voting security reasons. We know it's slightly less convenient than submitting it online, but it helps to ensure the security of your vote and is used to tackle electoral fraud.

Can I apply for a proxy vote?

You can apply for a proxy vote as long as you are on the electoral register. When you apply for a proxy vote you have to provide a reason. You can apply for a proxy vote if:

  • You are unable to go to the polling station for one particular election, for example, if you are away on holiday
  • You have a physical condition that means you cannot go to the polling station on election day
  • Your employment means that you cannot go to the polling station on election day
  • Your attendance on an educational course means that you cannot go to the polling station on election day
  • You are a British citizen living overseas
  • You are a crown servant or a member of Her Majesty's Armed Forces

Except if you are registered blind, you may have to get someone to support your application to confirm that your reason for applying to vote by proxy is valid. Read the notes that accompany the application form to find out if you need to get someone to support your application and who can do it.

When can I apply to vote by proxy?

The deadline for applying to vote by proxy is normally 6 working days before an election. However, if you have a medical emergency 6 days before election day or after, you can apply to vote by emergency proxy if the emergency means that you cannot go to the polling station in person.

Who can vote on my behalf?

Anyone can be your proxy as long as they are eligible to vote in that type of election and they are willing to vote on your behalf.

You cannot be a proxy for more than two people at any one election, unless they are a close relative.

Can I get electoral forms in large print, audio or a different language?

Either contact the registration officer on 01386 565437, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

How can I contact my local representative?

To find details of your local parish council, district and county councillors and Member of Parliament (MP) visit My Local Area.

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